Meanwhile, back in Canada

During the 2015 Federal Election campaign, Mr. Trudeau promised to end first-past-the-post elections in Canada. We voted with the understanding that a Liberal victory would mean the end of first-past-the-post elections. The Liberals won.

Mr. Trudeau and the Liberals made this promise knowing that Canadians are not united against first-past-the-post, nor united around a particular alternative.

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In 2005, single-transferrable-vote (STV) was put before British Columbians in a referendum, and 43% voted for the status quo. STV did not reach 60% support and was not adopted.

In 2008, BC held another referendum in which 60% voted for the status quo; 40% for STV.

A survey conducted by the Broadbent Institute just after the 2015 election found that “44% of Canadians prefer one of the proportional voting systems while 43% prefer the status quo, the single member plurality system.” This is consistent with previous surveys and historical data.

Despite the lack of clear consensus for a concrete alternative, the Liberals promised to do the hard work of selecting an alternative, educating the people, and passing the legislation needed to change our electoral system.

Why? Because proportional representation would produce better public policy.

And, they won. Sure, only 39.5% of Canadians voted for the Liberal Party in this past election, but that gave them 54% of the seats in Parliament, and a majority government.

Then, on February 1, 2017, Mr. Trudeau published this mandate letter. It said:

A clear preference for a new electoral system, let alone a consensus, has not emerged. Furthermore, without a clear preference or a clear question, a referendum would not be in Canada’s interest. Changing the electoral system will not be in your mandate.

Mr. Trudeau did not make his promise dependent on a consensus “emerging”. This consensus did not emerge in the past 25 years. It was never going to emerge in 12 months. In his promise, he committed to doing the hard work and expending the political capital to educate Canadians and develop whatever consensus is possible. A plan to passively wait for consensus to “emerge” is no plan at all.

If lack of consensus is all it takes to stymie the Liberal agenda, I don’t understand how they are proceeding with any of their promises (60.5% of Canadian voters didn’t vote for them), or how they are selecting which promises to work on and which to walk away from.

One thought on “Meanwhile, back in Canada

  1. The ‘lack of consensus’ argument really pisses me off too. I’ve also heard the Liberals try to argue that they abandoned PR because of a fear that it would give the alt-right more sway. Which is also bullshit. It is way more likely that Kellie Leitch leading the Conservative Party could form a government under first-past-the-post than under proportional representation.

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